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Senator

Glory

Fame can be fleeting and superficial. Glory comes with honorable achievementa and good work.

Maybe that's why so many celebrities have entered politics.

The first day you are in office, you can enact laws that you believe will make significant positive changes in people’s lives. Even if your bill doesn't pass, you can go to bed at night (no, not yet, next year) knowing you fought the good fight, speaking up for your beliefs and for your countrymen. You will work unbelievable hours under remarkable pressure, but you will not be doing it for fun or money. You will be doing it because you believe it's important. And it is important.

If you are elected Senator, you'll have the same job as Harry S. Truman. In fact, you could sit at Truman's desk. Just peek into the first drawer and you'll see his signature inked into the wood.

Think of addressing the 100 most powerful men and women in the United States and having every single word recorded, transcribed, and archived into the Congressional Record forever.

Even if you only win a single election and don't accomplish much, you still have the right to be addressed as Senator for the rest of your life.

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