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Abolitionists

Abolitionists

 Table of Contents

Abolitionists People

Who Made It Happen

Angelina Grimké Weld

Angelina Grimké Weld (1805-1879) was an abolitionist who wrote and lectured in favor of emancipation and women's rights. Horrified by the brutalities of slavery that she witnessed while growin...

Arthur Tappan

Arthur Tappan (1786-1865) was an American abolitionist from Northampton, Massachusetts. He became very wealthy from the dry goods business that he ran with his brother and partner, Lewis, in New Yo...

David Walker

David Walker (c.1796-1830) was a free black man, a self-taught clothes dealer, a radical abolitionist, a devout Christian, and a writer who published his self-titled David Walker's Appeal in 1829....

Elizur Wright

Elizur Wright (1804-1885) was an actuary (a statistician), a Yale graduate, and a leading abolitionist official in the American Anti-Slavery Society.During the summer of 1835, he had to barricade h...

Frederick Douglass

Frederick Douglass (c.1817-1895), born Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey, was a runaway slave, a supporter of women's rights, and probably the most prominent abolitionist and human rights leader...

Gerrit Smith

Gerrit Smith (1797-1874) was a wealthy abolitionist from Utica, New York. He was the only abolitionist to hold a Congressional office, the president of the New York Anti-Slavery Society for three y...

Harriet Beecher Stowe

Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811-1896) was an American abolitionist and novelist who wrote Uncle Tom's Cabin, one of the most influential books in American history. Her father was Lyman Beecher, pastor...

Harriet Tubman

Harriet Tubman (c.1820-1913), born Araminta Ross, was a runaway slave and abolitionist who guided some 300 fellow runaways to freedom as one of the most famous and successful "conductors" on the Un...

Henry Walton Bibb

Henry Walton Bibb (1815-1854) was a runaway slave and antislavery lecturer who published his autobiography, Narrative of the Life and Adventures of Henry Bibb, An American Slave, in 1849. Bibb's mo...

Henry Highland Garnett

Henry Highland Garnett (1815-1882) was one of the most prominent black leaders throughout the antebellum period and a leading figure in the American Anti-Slavery Society. An escaped slave, Garnett...

John Woolman

John Woolman (1720-1772) was the most influential Quaker antislavery activist prior to the revolutionary era. In 1754, Woolman published Some Considerations on the Keeping of Negroes, in which he a...

Lewis Tappan

Lewis Tappan (1788-1873) was an abolitionist, philanthropist, and activist who ran a very profitable dry goods business with his brother and partner, Arthur, in New York City. He founded the predec...

Lucretia Coffin Mott

Lucretia Coffin Mott (1793-1880) was a feminist, abolitionist, and one of the pioneers of the women's movement. She was a Quaker who both studied and taught at a Friends school near Poughkeepsie, N...

Lydia Maria Child

Lydia Maria Child (1802-1880) was a very influential antislavery author who came from an abolitionist family in Massachusetts. She married David Lee Child in 1828; both were avid antislavery activi...

Maria W. Chapman

Maria W. Chapman (1806-1885) was a prominent American abolitionist and a close associate of William Lloyd Garrison. She was a Ladies' High School principal in Boston before she married merchant Hen...

Sarah Moore Grimké

Sarah Moore Grimké (1792-1873) was an abolitionist who wrote and lectured as an advocate for emancipation and women's rights. She was born into a prominent slaveholding family in Charleston, S...

Sojourner Truth

Sojourner Truth (c.1797-1883), born Isabella Van Wagener, was one of the most famous female African-American abolitionists of the nineteenth century. Born into slavery, Truth was set free in 1827 a...

Wendell Phillips

Wendell Phillips (1811-1884) was a wealthy Harvard Law School graduate who gave up his career and social prestige in order to join up with the abolitionist cause in 1835. He became one of its most...

William Lloyd Garrison

William Lloyd Garrison (1805-1879) was one of the most prominent and uncompromising abolitionists of the nineteenth century. Garrison published The Liberator, an antislavery newspaper, from 1831 un...

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